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KATOUCHE POND

Entrance to Katouche Pond Looking to Sea

Katouche Pond is a small privately owned pond that is home to some of the last forest land in Anguilla.  Birdlife in the pond is very dependent on the water levels.  In fact the area is best known for a variety of terrestrial birds that pass through the area during migration as well as insects, crabs and lizards.  This is one place on Anguilla where you can get your hands dirty and scavenge for interesting things under rocks.

   

Forest Path

Folliage Surrounding Pond

   

Yellow-crowned Night Heron

A resident Yellow-crowned Night Heron will often pop out of the bush and begin to forage for food.  Other shorebirds that are seen in small numbers include Lesser Yellowlegs and Spotted Sandpipers. There are also a number of crab holes on the path around the pond.

Keep a watchful eye out for a number of amazing reptiles like the Dwarf Gecko shown in the photograph on the right.  This little one was found scurrying under a rock off the path.

Dwarf Gecko

Tree Lizard

Much of the wildlife blends in with the surroundings like the Tree Lizard in the photograph on the left.

Dragonflies are almost always present around the pond along with a few varieties of butterflies.

Dragonfly

Tree Hibiscus

If you are a fan of plant life, a number of species of trees and plants can be seen here.  Buttonwood and mangrove dominate the pond as well as the very dangerous Manchineel trees.  They can burn your skin when wet so take precautions and keep as far away from them as possible.

The valley itself is full of history as it was once the site of a plantation.  The remnants of an old well can be found behind the pond as you walk along the path.

Derelict Well

   

Pearly-eyed Thrasher

Pearly-eyed Thrashers are found in large numbers around the Katouche Pond.  Their very loud call can often drown out the calls of other species, in particular warblers.

On very rare occasions you might hear the call of the ellusive Mangrove Cuckoo.  Their call will alert you to their presence.  Then watch the trees for branch movement to help locate them.

Mangrove Cuckoo

Prothonotary Warbler

Photograph Courtesy Richard Brown

A few North American passerines such as the Prothonotary Warbler shown at the left have been known to pass through this valley in the spring and fall.  Black-and-white Warblers have been photographed there.  An elusive Ovenbird has been described but never photographed in Katouche.

The more common Yellow Warbler is often seen and heard here as well.

 

If you include the seabirds that frequent the bay at the entrance to the pond, Katouche can provide one of the most diverse wildlife experiences you will have while on Anguilla.  A quiet footprint and careful observation can pay big rewards on this nature trail.